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Defender
Defender

Defender
Oregano (Origanum vulgare), Thyme ct. thymol/carvacrol (Thymus vulgaris), Citronella (Cymbopogon nardis), Clove (Eugenia scayophyllata), Lemon (Citrus limonum), Cinnamon Bark (Cinnamon zeylanicum), Eucalyptus radiata, Rosemary ct verbenone (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Children? Not suitable 
Consider Immune Support.
Pregnancy/Breastfeeding? Not suitable due to Oregano and Cinnamon Bark. Consider Immune Support
Medication/Health Condition? Oral incompatibility: Anticoagulant, Antidepressants (CYP2B6 substrates), Diabetes, Diuretic medication; Childbirth, Major Surgery, Peptic Ulcer, Hemophilia

Properties
Strengthen immune response
Help establish unfriendly environment for yeast/fungus
Beneficial for respiratory issues

~ Read Safety Cautions below ~

Application Suggestions (See Essential Oil Usage for more information and a dilution chart.)

Since Defender is a strong skin irritant/sensitizer, it lends itself to be diffused or taken orally. Defender is generally used for serious health needs.

Topical: Dilute with a carrier oil and apply as desired. Oregano, Thyme, Clove and Cinnamon Bark are notable skin irritants and sensitizers. The maximum dermal use level of Defender is 0.8%. Use with caution and test your dilution on a small area first. Repeated use can result in contact sensitization. Use with caution on hypersensitive, diseased or damaged skin and on children under two years of age.

This works well in a roll-on applicatior with the carrier oil of your choice.

Inhalation: Diffuse "Do not expose children of five years or less to strong essential oil vapors" (Tisserand page 651).

Internal: Defender is suitable for internal use within safe parameters if such use is deemed appropriate. Due to the potential skin irritating properties in Defender, Dr. Kurt Schnaubelt feels the preferred mode of use is internally, ideally taken by capsule diluted with a suitable carrier oil. We feel that internal use is rarely *needed* and should only be used with respect for how concentrated the oils are. HEO does not advocate internal use of essential oils without appropriate knowledge and understanding of how to administer, for what purpose, how much, which essential oils, safety concerns and so on. In our experience, essential oils are generally more effective used topically with proper dilution or inhaled. Kurt Schnaubelt Ph.D. notes that "French aromatherapy literature contains many references to using oils orally." He goes on to note that "generally 1 drop is always enough when ingesting essential oils." A potential toxicity hazard could occur when untrained people use essential oils orally and ingest too much. Keep in mind that while medical doctors or health care practitioners may prescribe essential oils for internal use, they are trained and experienced in the safe application of essential oils. It is not a matter of using "French" or "British" methods, it's a matter of experience and appropriate application.

Children: Not for children orally six years old and under, and use in greater dilution for children older than six (Tisserand page 652-653).
Caution orally: Do not use orally in cases of hemophilia or severe kidney or liver disease.
Click here for information about internal usage.

Clove is 18% of the Defense blend. That is about 3-4 drops of Clove per mL, and there are roughly 20 drops of EO in a mL. For every 6 drops of Defense blend used, you use about one drop of Clove, which is about 1/20 of a mL.

Safety
Oregano Drug interaction Caution (oral): anticoagulant medication, diabetes medication, major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia and other bleeding disorders (Tisserand p. 255). Tisserand notes that "since eugenol significantly inhibits human MAO-A (Tao et al 2005), oral doses of eugenol-rich essential oils may interact with pethidine, indirect sympathomimetics, MAOIs or SSRIs."

Oregano Dermal Caution: Hypersensitive, diseased or damaged skin, children under 2 years of age (Tisserand page 254-256).

"An essential oil consisting of 93.9% carvacrol [the key component of Oregano] was given orally to pregnant rats during gestational days 0-15 at doses of 100, 500, or 1,000ppm. There were no signs of maternal toxicity or teratogenicity at any dose, and in the two higher does groups there was a significant increase in the number of implantation and live fetuses, a positive outcome" (Tisserand page 376).

Cinnamon Bark Pregnancy/Lactation Caution: is on the “avoid” if pregnant list because when it was fed to pregnant mice for two weeks it significantly reduced the number of nuclei and altered the distribution of embryos according to nucleus number (Tisserand p. 249).

Cinnamon Bark Oral Caution for Children: Not for children orally six years old and under, and use in greater dilution for children older than six (Tisserand page 652-653).

Cinnamon Bark Oral Caution for Hemophilia or severe Kidney or Liver Disease: Do not use orally.

Clove Drug interaction Caution (oral): anticoagulant medication, major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia and other bleeding disorders (Tisserand/Young p. 255).
Tisserand notes that "since eugenol significantly inhibits human MAO-A (Tao et al 2005), oral doses of eugenol-rich essential oils may interact with pethidine, indirect sympathomimetics, MAOIs or SSRIs."

Clove Dermal Caution: Hypersensitive, diseased or damaged skin, children under 2 years of age. Maximum dermal level: 0.5% (based on 96.9% eugenol content), which is 1 drop in 7 mLs of carrier (Tisserand/Young). Repeated use can result in contact sensitization. Skin test for sensitivity.

Avoid contact with the eyes and other sensitive areas. Essential oils are both lipophilic and hydrophobic. Lipophilic means they are attracted to fat— like the membranes of your eyes and skin. They are also hydrophobic, meaning they do not like water. Flushing with water will only send the essential oil back to the eye's membranes. Applying a carrier oil will create another fat for the essential oil to be attracted to other than the membranes of the eyes or skin. Tisserand suggests: "With essential oils, fatty oil has been suggested as an appropriate first aid treatment, though the advantage of saline [eyewash] is that the eyes can be continually flushed, and this is less easy with fatty oil." We’ve not known this to cause permanent injury or long-term discomfort, but if you feel concerned, please call your health care provider.

Reference
Schnaubelt, Kurt, 2013, Medical Aromatherapy: Healing with Essential Oils.
Tisserand, Robert; Young, Rodney, Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals, Elsevier Health Sciences UK, 2013, pages 152-153, 248-249, 254-256, 375-376.
 

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