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Christofori
Christofori

Christofori
Lavender (Lavendula angustifolia), Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin), Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanoides), Spruce Needle (Tusga canadensis), Rosewood (Aniba rosaeodora), Frankincense (Boswellia frereana/carterii), German Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla), Blue Tansy (Tanacetum annuum), Sweet Marjoram (Origanum majorana), Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile), Ylang Ylang (Cananga odorata), Amyris (Amyris balsamifera), Copaiba (Copaifera langsdorfii), Cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica), Australian Sandalwood (Santalum spicatum), Benzoin (Styrax benzoin), Peru Balsam (Myroxylon pereirae), Vanilla Absolute (Vanilla planifolia), Sandalwood Mysore (Santalum album)

Children? Suitable
Pregnancy/Breastfeeding? Suitable
Medication Caution? All Routes: Drugs metabolized by CYP2D6 and orally drugs metabolized by CYP1A2 and CYP3A4. 

Therapeutic Uses
Christofori essential oil blend may support, aid, ease, soothe, reduce, calm, relax, promote and/or maintain healthy function of the following:
Calming
Mental clarity, focus
Sleep

Application Suggestions (See Essential Oil Usage for more information and a dilution chart.)

Topical: Dilute with a carrier oilunscented lotion or unscented cream and apply on area of concern or as desired. Consider using a roll-on applicator for ease of application of prediluted oil. Some use this blend morning and evening applied over the heart, wrists and back of neck.

Inhalation: Diffuse or use a personal Nasal Inhaler

Testimonies
1. Love the aroma of this blend, and as a bonus, it helps my 7-year-old son who struggles with mood and attention issues (mainly at school). - Maggie

2. I tried several of your blends that have helped other children with mood and attention issues, and this one is definitely a keeper. I purchased about 4 blends and diluted each at about 3% into a roll-on applicator. I also put this, my daughter's favorite, into an inhaler so she can inhale as needed at school. - Lynn

3. My daughter was diagnosed with RAD (Reactive Airway Disease) at 4 weeks old after swallowing fluid at birth and never being able to get the fluid out on her own. Because of this, her lungs would frequently collapse and she has spent most of her life in and out of Children's Hospital. She  was never able to properly build her immune system because her lungs are so weak, and the doctors had finally decided about a year ago to try putting her on Singulair as a maintenance medication, since nothing else was working. Before this medication she was the most calm child, with a "go with the flow" attitude about everything and was extremely lovable and sweet. About a month after starting the medication I noticed she started to get agitated really easy, and the doctors had said that it was normal because her body was just adjusting to the new medication, but it would pass. The agitation soon turned into outright defiance, and angry outbursts. The doctors then said it was just her going through a toddler "phase" (she's 3.5 now). Soon after, she started trying to hurt her older sisters, and at dinner time one evening she threw a knife (thank God nobody was hit or hurt, but it scared me to death). I put all my knives in my bedroom, which I now keep locked, as she throws everything she can get her hands on. This isn't a "phase," this is something seriously wrong! After reaching out to Linda at Hopewell about my concerns and the things going on, she suggested I consider trying Adagio or Christofori to help calm her down. She also sent me some information about Singulair that I wish I had known a long time ago (it can actually change the chemical makeup in your child's brain). I reduced her dose of the Singulair, because it can cause withdrawal symptoms (something else I recently learned) and had her smell the 2 oils the first day they arrived. I noticed immediately that the 2 oils had a calming effect on her, and when she was having an angry outburst, just smelling the two oils together, calmed her down substantially. I was so overjoyed I wanted to cry, as I had tried everything to calm her during one of her fits, and I've never seen anything calm her this way! So I mixed the oils separately in roll-on applicators and tried them separately on her. I noticed they were helping a little bit, but when I put the two together and applied them on the back of her neck and over her heart (diluted), she would go an entire day without a outburst, or trying to hurt her sisters! It's literally like my prayers have been answered and I have my little girl back! It's so nice to see her play, run around and have something not go her way and see her stop and think it through instead of immediately reacting in a violent way. Thank you Linda (HEO), for your help has literally brought peace back into our home! - Stacey

4. Thank you for the best quality oils and oil blends out there. There are so many fake oils. I can do my research in a company or an oil and still not be satisfied that I have received the best oil. I never have to worry about yours. Now I've been using Christofori for my borderline austic child. It calms him down when he gets super hyper. Thank you so much for your dedication to such high quality and excellence. It gives me peace of mind to know I can always go to you for quality oils.  - Daniela

Safety
Medication Caution All Routes: drugs metabolized by CYP2D6 and orally drugs metabolized by CYP1A2 and CYP3A4.

Avoid contact with the eyes and other sensitive areas. Essential oils are both lipophilic and hydrophobic. Lipophilic means they are attracted to fat— like the membranes of your eyes and skin. They are also hydrophobic, meaning they do not like water. Applying a carrier oil will create another fat for the essential oil to be attracted to other than the membranes of the eyes or skin. Tisserand suggests: "With essential oils, fatty oil has been suggested as an appropriate first aid treatment, though the advantage of saline [eyewash] is that the eyes can be continually flushed, and this is less easy with fatty oil.” We are not aware of a case where essential oil in the eyes caused permanent injury or long-term discomfort, but if you feel concerned, please call your health care provider. 

Reference
Tisserand, Robert; Young, Rodney, Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals, Elsevier Health Sciences UK 2nd Edition 2014.
 

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